Darn it, more drugs

I had a check-up with my oncologist on Monday just to see how things were going. I had bloodwork a couple of days before, which came back mostly fine. I am slightly anemic, so Dr. Li recommended I start taking iron pills. I’m not too thrilled about it, but considering my multi-vitamin doesn’t contain iron (I was really surprised about that fact), I’ll probably do it. I only need one a day (or maybe every other day), which should minimize its constipation effects.

I did ask Dr. Li what he was looking for in my bloodwork (beyond the general blood counts). He explained that he’s watching to make sure my liver functions and kidney functions aren’t damaged, which would show up with some abnormal results. He’s also looking for high calcium levels, which is often a sign that the cancer has metastasized (especially to the bones) and can be a big problem. Luckily, all those chemical values were normal.

The two bad news items all had to do with the length of treatment. I asked Dr. Li how long I’d have to keep my port after my Herceptin treatments were over. His response – one to (preferably) two years. That’s the time frame that the cancer is mostly likely to recur, so the typical practice is to just leave the port in so it’s already available for treatment. That makes logical sense, but once again I was disappointed by the amount of time it takes to be done with all this cancer stuff. One to two years with my port means I’m pretty much done with my hockey career, and that is not a good thing.

Bad news number two is Dr. Li is recommending I take Tamoxifen, for the next ten years. Again, intellectually, I understand why he’s recommending this course of action (it potentially decreases the recurrence rate of the cancer with limited side effects) but TEN YEARS? I just want to go back to my old life, and it’s not happening any time soon.

And, on top of all that annoying news (it’s not really bad news – evidence of cancer is about the only bad news), I had to sit for an hour waiting for my Herceptin treatment because a new person at the Cancer Center screwed up the pharmacy order. All in all, not one of my better days at the Cancer Center.

Advertisements